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Boar-Sow housing

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This topic contains 8 replies, has 6 voices, and was last updated by  Hillcrest Farms 6 years, 8 months ago.

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  • #16363 Reply

    Corrine Smith
    Participant

    Should the boar and sow be kept separate until she is in heat? We only have the pair, possibly she might be pregnant but he has not had any interest in her for the last month and a half.

    Thank you

    #17222 Reply

    largebla
    Keymaster

    Hey Corrine , in my past experience with other pigs if the sow is already pregnant then she will not let the boar get anywhere near her . The sow will actually get very mean and physical to the boar . As far as keeping them separated I don’t know . I use to bring boars in for a while and when the sow started getting nasty I knew it was time for him to go . Good luck , Josh

    #17223 Reply

    Pamela
    Participant

    I’ve always kept them together until about a week prior to farrowing. It seems to keep everybody happy.. The boar doesn’t get too lonely, and the sow has enough time to build a nest and get comfy for farrowing. Works for us.

    #17224 Reply

    Corrine Smith
    Participant

    Thank you guys, I guess we’ll wait and see. I hate to separate them as they keep each other company and warm at night.

    #17225 Reply
    Member: TX Epps
    Epps
    Participant

    Hey Corrine, I am a completely new to all of this. I have a boar and two sows and when they got here both were pregnant already. I kept them all together, even through birth up until weaning. I then separated the little ones from the big ones. I have had no issues with them getting aggressive, other than feeding time, and when I gave them their own feeding “place” that aggressiveness went away. My boar and sows have been together since and have bred back and there has not been a problem with them being together. The respect and caring they(the boar and “other” sow)show to the little ones is a testament to the breed’s superiority as compared to the standard breeds of today. We are enjoying these guys very much.

    We wish you the best.

    Frank, Jane and Sarah

    #17230 Reply
    Member: MO chhogs
    chhogs
    Participant

    I’ll second that – we normally keep our boars & sows together also. The only problem we had this past winter was when the boar got his hormones all messed up after one of the farrowings & was breeding the sow right after she had farrowed! Silly girl stood still for him too. Sadly in all the shenanigans one of the piglets got stood on & subsequently died but we had never seen that happen before & wouldn’t expect to see it with just a boar & sow. We have several sows running with this particular boar.

    This breed are truly exceptional in every way 🙂

    Liz

    #17231 Reply

    largebla
    Keymaster

    I have to disagree a bit. Once a sow is bred, stress plays a critical role in how many fetuses she is able to carry and the number and size of the piglets in the litter. A boar with her will increase her stress as he competes for food, shelter and other needs. My experience shows that I get better litters by moving the boar away after the sow is bred.

    As for keeping the boar with the litter, this only increases the chance that a piglet will be injured.

    I have multiple bloodlines, both boar and sow, and my practice does require a lot of work (and a lot of fences and paddocks and feed troughs and extra cost) but I think I am having more and better litters than if I ran boars and sows together, not to mention the need to ensure I breed the right boar with the right sow.

    I keep my boars (all breeds) in a “bachelor” paddock, the sows in their paddock, the breeding pairs in a “date” paddock and as soon as a sow is showing milk she gets her own “maternity” paddock until the piglets are ready to wean. I do this on pasture in rotational paddocks except for the maternity paddocks that are in a fenced two acres. I’ll admit that moving individual hogs around is a pain but it’s all worth it.

    #17234 Reply
    Member: MO chhogs
    chhogs
    Participant

    Brian,

    How do you know that your sows are rebred if there is no boar in with them or nearby? Some of these LB’s are really difficult to detect heat on. Do you put the sow right in with a boar after weaning & leave them together for a couple cycles or just a couple days?

    How far away are your boars in their bachelor pad from your sows? I know it works for you & maybe it hasn’t worked for us because we have not had our boars far enough away from the sows but when a couple of our boars have broken through & met it has not been a pretty sight.

    Thanks

    Liz

    #17363 Reply
    Member: GA
    Hillcrest Farms
    Participant

    We use a similar system to Brian’s. All of my girls display visible signs of heat and I have learned I need to check frequently. The boys foam at the slightest anything when the girls are in heat. It is work to move them, but I think worthy of my time in the end. We have liked our set up and always reevaluate for possible needs from the pigs for changes in our system.

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