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Feeding eggs?

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This topic contains 19 replies, has 5 voices, and was last updated by  largebla 5 years, 2 months ago.

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  • #16595 Reply
    Member: TX
    HFFKip
    Participant

    We sell eggs and end up with a few culls (small/cracked/miss-shaped/etc). Are raw eggs ok to feed? At what quantity per hog? I’ve googled it found a some stuff but I wanted to get opinions here.

    Right now we probably only have a dozen or 2 per week of culls. At the end of the month though we have 90 RIRs set to start laying and will have an abundance of small pullet eggs.

    Thanks in advance.

    Kip

    #17718 Reply
    Member: MO chhogs
    chhogs
    Participant

    Hey Kip,

    We feed eggs to our Large Blacks regularly. There are different opinions out there – some saying you should cook the eggs as they are more digestible & other breeders saying that they have always fed theirs raw.

    We feed some of both. If I have enough to fill a big pot then I will boil them up, if I have only a few then we feed them raw. Pigs LOVE eggs & they are a complete protein. Our aim this year is to be feeding around 200 eggs a day. That is why we bought our chickens – free range eggs are REALLY cheap around here so not worth selling them. I would not hesitate to give a pig 6-12 eggs a day more if we have them. With a larger quantity we are going to have to figure out how many eggs equals a pound of grain as our aim is to feed less grain. Have not done that yet as the chickens are just starting to lay more now.

    Hope this helps,

    Liz

    http://www.cornishheritagehogs.com

    Missouri

    #17720 Reply
    Member: TX
    HFFKip
    Participant

    Thanks Liz. That does help.

    We only have 2x 10 month old gilts now but like you we are trying to feed less grain and therefore less $$$.

    My only concern is that I had read in a couple random forums that came up in a google search that raw eggs fed in “large” quantities blocks vitamin B absorption. Nowhere could I find what they defined/implied to be a “large” quantity. A dozen a day doesn’t seem to fit the bill.

    We could also cook them. It’s just another step in a long day. Worth it for their heath though.

    Once you have that ratio figured out, please do share it =)

    Thanks again,

    Kip

    #17721 Reply
    Member: MO chhogs
    chhogs
    Participant

    Yes when I posted I couldn’t remember what exactly eggs blocked. We are now getting a large pot full each day so I just stick them on the stove, wait for the water to boil & then turn them off so it is really not that much extra work.

    Use the potato masher next morning, leaving the liquid in the pot for easier mashing & then divide amongst the pigs at breakfast time. I’m guessing though even with all these eggs each pig is probably only getting 3-4 each so not that many. The chickens need to be laying more 🙂

    Liz

    http://www.cornishheritagehogs.com

    Missouri

    #17726 Reply

    largebla
    Keymaster

    We feed our broken or frozen eggs to the pigs raw and haven’t had any problems. Since I know where the chickens are raised and what they’re eating, I don’t worry about the eggs being dangerous. We probably feed up to a dozen a week to the hogs – 3 adults + piglets.

    ~Amy

    #17727 Reply
    Member: MO chhogs
    chhogs
    Participant

    Feeding raw eggs to pigs is not mainly about it being dangerous (although that is certainly worth thinking about with store bought eggs) but there have been studies done that show that cooked eggs are more easily digested. NOW if I make ice cream I use raw eggs too & also the odd raw egg goes in the slop bucket for the pigs so I really think a few is not going to make a difference. I think it’s when you are feeding 100’s. Yet again, everything in balance.

    When you are feeding pigs you want to make sure that you are increasing their ability to digest & use that food. I know when we fed rolled oats for a while although the pigs were getting a lot of food most of it was not being digested, therefore not being used & they lost condition so we discontinued using the oats. The aim in all this should be to decrease your feed costs & ensure the pigs are thriving. I can’t remember where I was reading it but some other study has proven that with just 2% of dairy in their diet, they will be able to “use” the grain much more efficiently meaning you would need to feed less. That is where we are aiming for 🙂

    Liz

    http://www.cornishheritagehogs.com

    Missouri

    #17730 Reply

    largebla
    Keymaster

    Our pigs get eggs thrown to them, too, since we have so many chickens running around and we find eggs in odd places now and then. :-)I know with dogs I was always told they couldn’t digest the whites if they were raw so maybe pigs are the same but like you said, Liz, as long as it’s not enormous amounts probably is okay. (my dogs eat raw eggs anyway! LOL) We feed our breeding pigs a complete swine feed but we also add milk to it and have found we can cut way back on the feed amount since we started that. We fatten our pigs on bread and milk – we buy feed bread locally and get all the discarded dairy products from a local dairy distributor.Most isn’t even outdated, sometimes the label is wrong, or the bottle capper didn’t fill the bottles all the way, stuff like that. We’ve done this for the past 2 years and our pigs produce wonderful pork and grow well. An old fellow told us orange juice will worm them and they do get oj from the dairy and honestly, we’ve not had any worm problems so may be something to that, too! They also get leftover produce from the grocery store in town and they go nuts when that comes out. Only thing they don’t care for a lot are the potatoes but if we cut them up they’ll eat them – LAST. 😉 Our big boar loves onions – he’ll peel the outer skin and crunch them down while the rest go crazy for oranges, peel and all! The only reason we feed the breeders swine feed is because they got too fat on the other.

    #17735 Reply
    Member: MO chhogs
    chhogs
    Participant

    I have heard that potatoes in any large quantity should be cooked so maybe if you get a load you can spoil them with some mashed potatoes & gravy! LOL!

    Had not heard about OJ being good for worming – that’s interesting.

    Do you feed any minerals to your breeders?

    Liz

    http://www.cornishheritagehogs.com

    Missouri

    #17737 Reply

    largebla
    Keymaster

    No, we don’t feed anything extra to the breeders, except we do give them milk with their feed. The feed is produced locally and is a complete, natural feed. A friend of ours has been feeding his pigs on it for a couple of years and is very happy with it and his pigs do look great. Plus it’s a bit cheaper than some of the other feeds so that never hurts if all else is good! 😉

    As for the orange juice as a wormer, I don’t have any proof it works, just know that we haven’t had any pigs pass worms or look wormy (rough coat, big belly, just unthrify appearing) since we started feeding it to them. We did buy a heavy bred hampshire sow last year who pigged about 2 weeks after we got her. She was rough looking and so were her piglets although she did have 11. We started her and the ‘kids’ on OJ (the babies will start drinking oj and milk within a couple of weeks) and it wasn’t long until they looked slick and nice, like the rest of ours. So might be something to it!

    Steph

    PS don’t think I’ll be fixing any mashed potatoes and gravy for them though! LOL!

    #17751 Reply
    Member: TX
    HFFKip
    Participant

    Liz, thanks for the technique! We’ve been boiling them at night and feeding the next morning also. They LOVE the boiled eggs even more! They are getting a good dozen each 3-4 times a week =)

    Kip

    #17752 Reply
    Member: MO chhogs
    chhogs
    Participant

    Glad the pigs are happy 🙂

    Liz

    http://www.cornishheritagehogs.com

    Missouri

    #17753 Reply
    Member: TX Shiner Pork
    Shiner Pork
    Participant

    Don’t let the government find out you’re feeding eggs, especially if the kids are doing it. It is now against the law, across the nation!

    If that upsets you, let your congressman/congresswoman know, and get them to legislate freedom for family farms that still rely on our wonderful children to pitch in and (gasp!) work.

    If we’re not careful, they are going to be taking over all our farms through regulation and legislation.

    #17758 Reply

    president
    Participant

    Are you referring to 9 C.F.R. part 166? That is the Federal document covering Garbage feeding to pigs. The wording is a little loose in that it ‘hints’ that it is referring to raw meat, but doesn’t say so specifically. The Federal CFR does not override the State laws though.

    Here’s what Missouri law states…

    266.410. As used in sections 266.410 to 266.460, “garbage” shall mean all refuse matter, animal or vegetable, and shall include all waste material, by-products of a kitchen, restaurant, or slaughterhouse, every refuse accumulation of animal, fruit, or vegetable matter, liquid or otherwise.

    Eggs are not refuse by any means of the definition, unless they are on a garbage heap somewhere.

    If you are referring to something else then please let me know.

    Thanks

    Richard

    #17761 Reply
    Member: TX
    HFFKip
    Participant

    If they don’t outright define “garbage” then they won’t stop feeding them horrible things. One man’s trash is another man’s treasure.

    According to that Missouri Law, one could not feed corn stalks, broccoli stems, bruised tomatoes, cull apples… etc… etc… left over from a garden???? You could even stretch that definition to hay! Isn’t hay an “accumulation of vegetable matter?”

    Wow! ****Head shaking****

    Our eggs are not refuse. We eat the “cull” non sell-able ones ourselves. There are just too many of them to keep up with =)

    Now that I re-read that Missouri Law are they specifically defining those items as coming from a “kitchen, restaurant or slaughterhouse?”

    #17762 Reply
    Member: TX Shiner Pork
    Shiner Pork
    Participant

    Actually I was referring to the new farm labor regulations being introduced by the Labor Department, headed by Ms. Solis. In it, it states, no children under the age of 16 may feed animals on a farm, commercial or family. Period. No exceptions, not even for FFA projects, etc… These new regulations make it virtually impossible for children under the age of 16 to work on the farm, family or commercial. Hold onto your boots people… things are about to get ugly.

    I will not comply!

    Ross

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