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THE LARGE BLACK HOG ASSOCIATION

The premier registry and support association for Large Black hogs in the United States.

The Large Black Hog Association (LBHA) is the premier registry and support association for Large Black hogs in the United States. We are a non-profit association, managed by a group of dedicated volunteers, owners and breeders of this wonderful heritage hog.

The recovery of this breed in the United States is directly due to the efforts of our members. We are proud of our success and invite you to join us!

WHAT IS SO SPECIAL ABOUT THE LARGE BLACK HOG?

Perhaps the most important thing about Large Blacks is their pedigree.

Perhaps the most important thing about Large Blacks is their pedigree. These are “heritage” hogs. They retain the traits of their ancestors that lived on the pastures and woods of England in the 16th and 17th centuries. They are hardy animals able to handle the cold and heat. They can effectively convert pasture and goodies found in your woods into nutrition. Great mothering ability; good sized litters; longevity. Despite their large size they are well known as very docile hogs. Their dark coloring makes them more resistant to sunburn. And their pork might be the best available; micromarbled and deliciously Old World flavor.

2045

REGISTERED HOGS

8832

TOTAL HOGS IN DATABASE

WHY REGISTER WITH THE LBHA?
WE ARE A MEMBER RUN ORGANIZATION

The LBHA consists of a wide variety of people with a common interest – ensuring the long term viability of the large black hog breed. The LBHA Board is elected from the membership and is responsible for helping each member succeed in their endeavors.

WE ACCEPT ANY PUREBRED LARGE BLACK HOG REGISTRATION

Regardless of where it was born, or if it came from artificial insemination, if you can prove it is purebred you can register it with us.

WE ARE MORE THAN JUST A REGISTRY

When you join the LBHA you gain access to a wide network of breeders and enthusiasts who can help with finding hogs, teach how to raise them, help you sell them and provide good contacts to veterinarians, processors, feed suppliers and other people who can help you.

ALL OF YOUR FEES GO BACK TO HELP MEMBERSHIP

The LBHA is a nonprofit organization. The Board members are all volunteers. All of the money collected through registrations and donations is used to fund LBHA activities including outreach and maintaining the registry (the LBHA pays its Registrar a small fee per transaction) and this website.

RECOGNITION AND INTEGRITY

The LBHA has quickly become the registry of choice for serious breeders and buyers of Large Black hogs. We have gained this trust through ensuring the integrity of our registry. While we are easy to work with we have very high standards to make sure that only purebred hogs are registered. The registry database is monitored by two Board members in addition to the Registrar, providing checks and balances to verify that it is managed correctly. We also track the genetic diversity of our registered hogs; we are the only Large Black hog registry in the world that tracks the inbreeding coefficient of all registered hogs and provides help to our breeders to reduce inbreeding throughout the breed. We have established good relationships with the American Livestock Breeds Conservancy and Large Black hog organizations in other countries. When you advertise that your hogs are registered with the LBHA, your customers will know that they are getting great value for their money.

FROM FACEBOOK
Large Black Hog Association added 2 new photos.
Large Black Hog Association

BREED STANDARD

CONFORMATION: Now let's move to the other end of the hog and discuss the hams. Our hogs can never compete with the massive size of the hams in commercial or show hogs. However keep in mind how those hogs move. Our hogs have to be able to move well on pasture so we don't want them to get TOO big. The photo I am using to discuss hams are 3 3 month old pigs that we were pushing a bit to take to fair. I thought they were a good example to use as they have nice thick hams without being overly fat to where they can't move well. This is very important when we are looking for breeders that are going to be producing market animals. We want to make sure that we have well muscled good sized hams without carrying excessive condition!

HAMS: our standard says

"Hams: Very broad, firm and full. Well-muscled down to the hock
Objections: Small, thin or shallow "

I think this is a pretty straight forward statement without much explanation needed.
Amy McKamey
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2 weeks ago  ·  

November's Pig of the Month - Photo Credit: Katie Baier, Valley Pasture Farm, Elk Mound, WI. (2018 LBHA Calendar Submission) ... See MoreSee Less

2 weeks ago  ·  

Large Black Hog Association updated their cover photo.
Large Black Hog Association

Photo Credit: Katie Baier, Valley Pasture Farm, Elk Mound, WI. (2018 LBHA Calendar Submission) ... See MoreSee Less

2 weeks ago  ·  

Large Black Hog Association added 2 new photos.
Large Black Hog Association

BREED STANDARD

CONFORMATION: As we build our hogs from the ground up we need to now look at the major components of the body of our hogs. So lets start with the shoulder. Keep in mind the boar in the photo I am using is fairly young at the time so not fully filled out. However, we are looking at the structure of the hog right now not condition so I thought this would be a nice example to use as you can see his conformation very well. I am using all my own personal photos for demonstration issues.

SHOULDER:

Our Standard says:
"Shoulders: Broad, deep and full. Muscle should extend well down and in line with the ribs.Shoulder should not protrude above the line of the back.
Objections: Small, thin and shallow. Protruding above the line of the back."

Now keep in mind as well we are talking muscle not fat so even though this hog is not carrying much extra condition he is well muscled. Another point to make here is that you never want your breeders carrying excess condition. We will talk more about that later. He has good shape in that shoulder and his shoulder does not extend above his back line which makes a nice smooth profile. He has good bone to be able to carry a nice heavy muscle.
Amy McKamey
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3 weeks ago  ·  

Large Black Hog Association added 4 new photos.
Large Black Hog Association

BREED STANDARD

CONFORMATION:

After looking at the hogs for major disqualifications the next single most important subject is conformation. Nothing else matters if your hog isn't put together well. Color, nipples, ears, hair coat are all only skin deep. You have to have a well built sturdy healthy hog first and foremost. Now that being said this is a huge topic so we are gong to break it down and go over each section of the standard separately in hopes that we can help each of you understand it a bit better and hopefully help you in choosing your breeders.

LEGS:

The standard says:

"Legs: Well set under the hog, straight and strong with a nice taper. Pasterns strong. Feet firm and tough. Toes balanced, straight and of equal size.
Objections: Legs out of proportion to body, Splayed or crooked toes. Toes of unequal size. Badly deformed legs, broken down legs, low pasterns, extra toes or excessively bent hocks. "

We are going to start with legs. Because if you don't first have a good foundation you can't build the rest of your hog. What happens if you build on a crooked foundation? The building falls apart right?
I have personally found that our breed is weak in this department. I honestly believe people are forgetting to look at their hogs legs and feet and we have some issues as a whole in the breed in this department. Our hogs tend to be a lot more narrow in body then most of the hogs out there. For the most part this is ok, however, when you then add leg issues it exaggerates issues with walking. I have seen many hogs that are cow hocked and knock kneed. To the point where their hocks hit when they walk. As an association we need to make sure that we are putting focus on breeding hogs with well set legs that are good and strong to hold up out on pasture. Those rear legs should not touch when they stand and you should have some gap between those back legs just like the sows shown in these photos. You should have nice bone on your hogs as well. Don't forget about their feet. Check those hooves as well. Make sure they are balanced, straight and of equal size. We do not want to build show pigs here, but we do need a nice solid base to build on. These hogs should be able to run faster then you on these legs!
Amy McKamey
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4 weeks ago  ·  

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